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Batu Hotels

28-story, 548-key, 570,000 SF, twin-tower, 5-star and 4-star hotels

Batu, East Java, Indonesia

Program

Hotel, 420,000 SF

Room, 548-key

Amenity, 110,000 SF

Parking Garage, 150,000 SF

Space, 466-car

Build

New Construction

Client

Confidential

Service

Design Architect

The design of Batu Hotels celebrates the lush, rolling Indonesian landscape and its regional climate. The twin 28-story towers are oriented to capture views of the city below and 3 active volcanoes beyond. The mountainous site is cyclically enveloped in mist each morning, which inspired the overarching design concept – a tower rising from the mist among the mountains.

The resort is organized to preserve the existing landscape by minimizing its footprint. A green roof on top of the ballroom, which connects the two hotel structures, restores the existing ecology of the site by reintroducing native flora and fauna. A rainwater harvesting system provides water for landscape irrigation and helps supply water to the project’s fountains and pools. An outdoor covered wedding chapel is located on the green rooftop with its altar backdrop positioned to frame the distant views of the mountains and the skies.

The perimeter floor edges of the twin hotel towers are lined with organic curves and sloped walls that minimize the edge thickness, creating an overall effect of a figuratively evolving towers along their heights. 5G Studio Collaborative designed a dynamic shading system that passively keeps the guestrooms cool and reduces solar heat gain. The bases of the towers land on a podium that houses restaurants, amenities, and conference facilities on its ground and second levels. The podium further descends into the steeply sloped site where Villas with private swimming pools are carved into the side of the hill. At the bottom level, a large swimming pool deck area was designed with its back against the carved Villas and its open side fronting the amazing views beyond.

Awards

2020 AIA Dallas Unbuilt Design Awards

Publications

World Architecture Review Vol. 37 No. 203, 2022

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